Wednesday, 3 June 2015

2015-040: Achievement Gap Estimates and Deviations from Cardinal Comparability

Otmane El Rhazi, Eric R. Nielsen. This paper assesses the sensitivity of standard empirical methods for measuring group differences in achievement to violations in the cardinal comparability of achievement test scores. The paper defines a distance measure over possible weighting functions (scalings) of test scores. It then constructs worst-case bounds for the bias in the estimated achievement gap (or achievement gap change) that could result from using the observed rather than the true test scale, given that the true and observed scales are no more than a fixed distance from each other. The worst-case weighting functions have simple, closed-form expressions consisting of achievement thresholds, flat regions in which test scores are uninformative, and regions in which the observed test scores are actually cardinally comparable. The paper next estimates these worst-case weighting functions for black/white and high-/low-income achievement gaps and gap changes using data from several commonly employed surveys. The results of this empirical exercise suggest that cross-sectional achievement gap estimates tend to be quite robust to scale misspecification. In contrast, achievement gap change estimates seem to be quite sensitive to the choice of test scale. Standard empirical methods may not robustly identify the sign of the trend in achievement inequality between students from different racial groups and income classes. Furthermore, ordinal methods may be more powerful and will continue to have the correct size when the test scale has been misspecified. Full Text

Regards,
Otmane El Rhazi
Press Releases
Equity Trading
Text/Mobile, +44 7414 782 320


RISK DISCLOSURE STATEMENT
ANY OPINIONS, NEWS, RESEARCH, ANALYSIS, OR OTHER INFORMATION ON THIS WEBSITE IS PROVIDED AS GENERAL MARKET COMMENTARY ONLY. THERE ARE RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH UTILIZING AN INTERNET-BASED DEAL EXECUTION TRADING SYSTEM INCLUDING THE FAILURE OF HARDWARE, SOFTWARE, AND INTERNET CONNECTION.

No comments:

Post a Comment